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Latest Research Findings from the HWSETA

The HWSETA has successfully completed three research projects. These include:

  • A baseline study on students’ perceptions and attitudes towards the HWSETA Artisan Programme
  • A baseline study on students’ perceptions and attitudes towards the HWSETA Postgraduate Research Bursary Programme
  • A mid-term evaluation of the HWSETA pre-apprenticeship project

Click here to access the research studies

HWSETA Establishes Firm Footprint in Northern Cape

Kimberley, 22 July 2016: Having identified that the Northern Cape was an area where a great deal more could be done in terms of skills development and employer involvement in developing South Africa’s skills base, the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) set about identifying programmes and projects that through their implementation would realise, not only skills development, but much needed capacity building in communities.

A launch function for the projects and programmes that have been implemented was held on 22 July 2016 at the Mittah Seperepere Convention Centre in Kimberley. The event was attended by the Honourable Minister of Higher Education and Training, Dr Blade Nzimande, who delivered the keynote address at the event.

The HWSETA has made an investment of R16 million to benefit the communities of the Northern Cape through partnerships with the Northern Cape Premier’s Education Trust Fund (NCPETF); the Department of Education; the Department of Social Development; the Northern Cape Rural TVET College; the Northern Cape Urban TVET College and the Northern Cape Community Education and Training College.

The launch function followed the official opening of the HWSETA Provincial Office in the Northern Cape by the Honourable Dr Blade Nzimande. The HWSETA has established an office in the province to better meet the needs of stakeholders in the province, as well as work closer with employers in opening up their places of work as places of training.

Commenting on the involvement of employers in skills development initiatives, the CEO of the HWSETA, Yvonne Mbane, says: “An employer that contributes a skills development levy and fails to participate robs surrounding communities the opportunity of development and growth.”

The projects being funded by the HWSETA will see 42 financially needy students residing in the Northern Cape studying health and social development qualifications receiving the funding they require; 273 learners from the Northern Cape Rural TVET and Northern Cape Urban TVET Colleges being trained in early childhood development; and 1800 unemployed persons at 12 community education and training centres across the province, of which 6 are in rural areas, being funded for adult education and training programmes.

“These partnerships are not only an important milestone for the HWSETA, but serve as a massive step towards skills development and empowering communities in the Northern Cape.” concludes Ms Mbane.

 

HWSETA Funds Animal Health Training in Eastern Cape

Ntabankulu, Eastern Cape, 26 May 2016: The link between animal and human health, combined with the need for rural communities to be capacitated in improved animal health has seen the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) commit funding to a variety of animal health projects and programmes over the last 18 months.

Communities from the Alfred Nzo Municipal District in the Eastern Cape are the latest beneficiaries of HWSETA funding in that 400 individuals, cooperatives and small businesses will receive training in various animal health skills programmes and of this number 200 will be funded for entrepreneurial skills workshops. Whilst the funding will benefit 400 people directly, the funding will be far reaching as the skills and knowledge gained will benefit the community at large through improved animal healthcare in the area.

The programme is the result of a partnership between the HWSETA and Alfred Nzo Development Agency (ANDA) situated in Mount Ayliff. The partnership was celebrated at a function held at the Royal Residence of Chief Sigcau in Ntabankulu on 26 May 2016.

“To meet the country’s need for animal health, to facilitate transformation and drive skills development within the veterinary sector and to capacitate rural communities in terms of animal health are key deliverables for the HWSETA,” comments Ms Yvonne Mbane, CEO for the HWSETA.

According to Honourable Madzikane II, CEO of ANDA: “With 18% of the population of Alfred Nzo being functionally illiterate, thus compounding the challenge to create much needed jobs for the more than 29 0000 unemployed people, the Programme between ANDA and HWSETA is the continuation of our efforts to build capacity and skills that will stimulate the regional economy which will not only bring hope but create job opportunities within our local context.”
“This partnership with ANDA is an important milestone, that not only contributes towards the HWSETA meeting its mandate, but will also offer significant benefit to the communities within the Alfred Nzo Municipal District,” concludes Ms Mbane.

HWSETA and SSACI Partnership Yields First Group of Trained Artisans

Johannesburg, 5 March 2016: Unless South Africa ramps up its annual training of artisans to 30 000 a year by 2030, the country’s requirement for artisans in the construction, engineering and other relevant sectors will not be met and the impact will be felt in the sustainability of these industries and very importantly, economic growth. The decline in the training of artisans started in the mid-1980s and by 2013 was identified as an urgent priority for the country.

The revival of artisan training is one of the stated priorities of the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET). To this end, artisan training has become a key performance area for South Africa’s 21 Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) with each SETA having committed to a target figure of trained artisans.

In 2013, the Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA) partnered with the Swiss-South African Cooperation Initiative (SSACI) to train 100 out-of-school, unemployed young South Africans with skills in demand by employers and institutions in the health and social development sectors. The successful completion of trade tests by 68 of this group was celebrated at a function hosted in Johannesburg on 5 March 2016.

The HWSETA committed R16.8 million in funding for the theoretical and practical training of the selected youngsters as boilermakers; electricians; fitters; fitters and turners; millwrights; as well as tool, jig and die makers.

In the past, an artisan’s training spanned a period of three to four years, however over the last three years national regulations and procedures for artisan training have undergone a major overhaul.

“This project seeks to trailblaze the shortest possible route to an artisan qualification,” comments Ken Duncan, CEO for SSACI “and it opens a sustainable new pathway that will henceforth be offered within the mainstream national skills training system.”

“After a long interval during which the country’s industrial skills base was allowed to shrink through a serious lack of training in the artisan trades, apprenticeships are back.” continues Duncan. “The world of work has changed a great deal but so too have apprenticeships – they have moved with the times and remain as effective as ever in providing school-leavers with technical skills that are sought by industry and open doors to decent employment.”

“South Africa’s artisan training target of 30 000 artisans annually by 2030 is a massive challenge, but if every role player that is able to participate does so, as a country we can succeed and it is because of this that the HWSETA sees this project as a valuable contribution not only to address the country’s artisan shortage, but also to address poverty, unemployment and inequality,” comments Yvonne Mbane, CEO for the HWSETA.

As the SETA that operates within the health, social development and veterinary sectors, artisan training is not the HWSETA’s core business and therefore an area where the expertise of an organisation such as SSACI was required. Through SSACI’s involvement in this project, the HWSETA is assured that the funding committed to the training of these artisans will at completion contribute to the country’s artisan requirements, as well as assist these young people with a viable future as a trained artisan.

The graduation of these artisans is the first major milestone in the collaboration between the HWSETA and SSACI, but it is by no means the end of the road. There are other projects underway that will see more artisans qualifying and then able to contribute to the artisan skills pool.

“The successful completion of this project will make an important contribution to the HWSETA fulfilling its mandate of upskilling artisans in South Africa and the HWSETA has every intention of pursuing further such opportunities,” concludes Ms Mbane.

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About the HWSETA

Skills development is a national priority for South Africa and meeting the country’s skills needs requires collaboration between numerous public and government entities, educational institutions, training providers, as well as private organisations, no matter how big or small.

South Africa’s economy is divided into functional sectors and each of these sectors is represented by one of 21 Sector Education Training Authorities (SETAs). The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) is responsible for the education, training and skills development requirements of the health, social development and veterinary sectors.

The HWSETA exists to achieve the following within the sectors it serves:

• Develop and implement the Sector Skills Plan
• Skills development planning, programmes and initiatives
• Monitoring of education and training
• Identification of workplaces for practical work experience
• Support and facilitate the development of the National Skills Development Strategy
• Disbursement of levies collected
• Forge links with all stakeholders and relevant bodies
• Account for the effective and efficient use of public monies in line with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act
• Promotion of the employment of disabled persons

About the Swiss-South African Cooperation Initiative
The Swiss-South African Cooperation Initiative is a public-private partnership in development between the Swiss and South African governments and Swiss and South African companies. It aims to improve the national, public skills training system and to open up new pathways to employment for young South Africans through innovative training projects.
Through SSACI, Swiss companies and the Swiss government have together committed over R100 million to skills development for South African youths. Working alongside government and partnering with other development agencies, SSACI has developed and implemented projects that can be taken to scale for maximum impact.

Issued By:

Elfrieda Tyrer
Marketing Manager
HWSETA
Tel: 011 607 7015/083 644 1700
E-mail: elfriedat@hwseta.org.za

HWSETA Joins Forces with UP Faculty of Veterinary Science in Skills Development Initiatives

Onderstepoort, 28 January 2016: The marked growth in South Africa’s human and animal populations within an environment characterised by climate change, emerging pathogens and toxic releases has resulted in increased health risks for humans and animals alike. To address this, the perspective on public health should be expanded beyond a single species to detect and manage emerging public health threats.

The link between animal and human health, combined with the need for skills development and transformation within the animal health sector, has resulted in the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) placing focus on programmes to meet these critical needs.

“The HWSETA has made extensive inroads into partnerships with institutions of higher learning to meet its mandate within the animal health sector and the R15 million committed to a number of key projects with the University of Pretoria’s Faculty of Veterinary Science is set to establish this as a flagship project,” comments Yvonne Mbane, CEO of the HWSETA.

The funding made available by the HWSETA to the University of Pretoria will cover eight key projects, including: 20 undergraduate student bursaries for first year students; work integrated learning for final year students; undergraduate research bursaries; 42 postgraduate student bursaries; skills laboratory teaching aids; training of 20 learners for manufacturing of teaching aids ; ‘Adopt a School’ pilot project; and articulation with agricultural colleges

The Faculty of Veterinary Science has wasted no time in setting up partnerships with agricultural colleges and by the end of 2015, discussions between management at the Faculty of Veterinary Science and Tsolo Agricultural and Rural Development Institute (TARDI) in the Eastern Cape were well underway. The support for TARDI by the Faculty of Veterinary Science has been made possible through HWSETA funding and will further supplement HWSETA funding of 50 full bursaries for learners at TARDI to become animal health technicians.

“The HWSETA funding will make a significant contribution to our training and research programmes and we are very grateful for the HWSETA support,” comments Darrell Abernethy, Dean at the Faculty of Veterinary Science. “And, it will also assist us in networking with institutions that train veterinary technicians and agricultural students.”

“As the only veterinary faculty in South Africa we have a unique responsibility to train all veterinarians and veterinary nurses in the country,” continues Abernethy.

“We also conduct cutting-edge research on a wide range of animal-related diseases and issues that affect people. This is because of the close relationship between people, animals and the environment and the crucial role that veterinarians play in reducing the risk of diseases passing from animals to people, ensuring food safety and promoting food security.”

A progressive increase in student numbers, the availability of teaching animals, as well as animal welfare issues, have resulted in a massive shift internationally in veterinary clinical teaching methods through the introduction of veterinary simulators and models. Having recognised the value that a skills laboratory could add to its teaching and learning processes prompted the UP’s Faculty of Veterinary Science to invest heavily in a world class skills facility. Two of the projects funded by the HWSETA support the skills facility that directly impacts every student within the Faculty of Veterinary Science.

“The partnerships with TARDI and UP’s Faculty of Veterinary Science are just a beginning, yet we consider them important steps in addressing the country’s need animal health and transformation in the veterinary sector,” concludes Ms Mbane.

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Find out more about the UP Faculty of Veterinary Science click here

 

Details on projects being funded by the HWSETA:

Undergraduate students:

• 20 x Undergraduate student bursaries (1st year)

Twenty bursaries will be offered annually to students who have the potential to succeed but are constrained through financial hardship. The bursaries will be granted annually through the duration of the students’ studies and will be contingent on academic success each year.

• Work integrated learning for final year students

The final 18 months of the veterinary programme is wholly practical and students travel between sites to increase their veterinary experience. This bursary will give all students equal opportunity to gain experience anywhere in SA and especially in rural environments.

• Undergraduate research bursaries

Attracting young South African graduates into research is extremely difficult for various reasons (priority to repaying student debt, limited number of students, higher remuneration elsewhere). These bursaries provide an incentive for high-achieving students to consider a research career; granting of the award will necessitate that the student spends two years in an internship immediately following Compulsory Community Service after graduation (if an internship bursary is available. The student will be encouraged to commence a post-graduate research degree at the Faculty).

Postgraduate students:

• 42 postgraduate student bursaries

These bursaries facilitate the training of South African veterinarians and in research on animal health and welfare, human health as it relates to animals/animal products, and food security. In this way they develop South African research and academic capacity as well as scientific leadership in the veterinary sector, particularly among previously disadvantaged groups.

Other projects:

• Skills laboratory

The Onderstepoort Skills Laboratory is an internationally recognised and world-class facility that allows students the opportunity to practice on animal models before trying their new-found skills on live animals. This reduces stress on both students and animals and incorporates a unique community-based project in production of the models.

• Training 20 learners for manufacturing of teaching aids

Through a community engagement initiative, young South Africans from the local community will be invited by the Faculty to take part in the process of model development and production by going through a 6-8 week training programme for model development.

• Adopt a school pilot project

It is essential for the future of the veterinary profession in South Africa that black learners and students, particularly from rural areas, apply to study veterinary science. This project supports this goal by having selected veterinary practices and state veterinarians “adopt” a local school, engage with Biology/Science learners and, with the assistance of the Faculty of Veterinary Science, help gifted learners to pursue a career in veterinary science.

• Articulation with agricultural colleges

The Faculty of Veterinary Science is the only veterinary faculty in South Africa but there are multiple other institutions that train agriculturalists and veterinary technicians. This project promotes networking between the Faculty and such organisations to ensure articulation between the respective programmes so that non-veterinary students may enter the veterinary programme.

Second Clean Audit Awarded to HWSETA

The HWSETA is one of seven SETAs awarded a clean audit for the 2014 – 2015 financial year. This is the second consecutive year that the HWSETA has received recognition for its achievements in terms of corporate governance, risk management, consistent application of internal control, knowledge of the application of legislation and Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP)/International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), leadership oversight, as well as staff dedicated and committed to clean reporting.

“This achievement follows a seven year period of maintaining good performance relating to financial statements that resulted in an unqualified audit each year,” comments Elaine Brass, Chief Financial Officer at the HWSETA.

The trophy awarded to the HWSETA for its first clean audit during the 2013 – 2014 financial period was returned to the HWSETA with a second plaque at the Auditor-General’s presentation on National Audit Outcomes on 3 August 2015.

“A clean audit means an unqualified audit with no emphasis of matter, no findings under internal control weaknesses, no findings under noncompliance with legislation, and finally no findings on predetermined objectives or as we refer to it, performance information,” adds Ms Brass.

“The HWSETA operates within the health and social development sectors that are critical in this country, yet also extremely challenging and this in itself makes the HWSETA’s achievement of a clean audit that much more remarkable,” says Yvonne Mbane, CEO for the HWSETA.

“We set the bar high in the previous financial year and the fact that we have been successful at achieving a clean audit for a second year running speaks volumes about the dedication shown by the HWSETA Board, Management and Staff to deliver on its skills development mandate,” concludes Ms Mbane.

The HWSETA and Tshwane North TVET College Join Forces to Train Artisans

Pretoria, 20 August 2015: The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) has joined forces with Tshwane North TVET College (TNC) to train 100 young unemployed learners as artisans. The launch function, held on 20 August 2015 in Pretoria, was attended by the Honourable Mr Mduduzi Manana, Deputy Minister of Higher Education and Training.

In his speech Mr Manana said, “We believe that skilling our labour force will play a role in fighting unemployment directly by providing skilled people to a skills-starved economy, but also indirectly by providing a stimulus to economic growth and the development of new and existing industries and economic sectors”.

Unless South Africa ramps up its annual training of artisans to 30 000 a year by 2030, the country’s requirement for artisans in the construction, engineering and other relevant sectors will not be met and the impact will be felt in the sustainability of these industries and very importantly, economic growth. The decline in the training of artisans started in the mid-1980s and by 2013 was identified as an urgent priority for the country.

The national government policy titled ‘White Paper for Post-school Education and Training: Building an Expanded, Effective and Integrated Post-school System’ was approved by Cabinet in November 2013 and in January 2014 the Minister of Higher Education and Training, the Honourable Dr Blade Nzimande, released the policy that not only directly supports the implementation of the National Development Plan 2030, but makes specific provision for the development of trained artisans.
The achievement of the artisan development targets that have been set is dependent on two factors. The first of these is sustained, committed and high profile political leadership and second is considerable investment and commitment by all artisan development role players in South Africa.

South Africa’s 21 Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), as well as the 50 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges have a key role to play in reaching the target for trained artisans.

Since the launch of the Ten Year Ministerial Advocacy Programme known as the ‘Decade of the Artisan’ in 2014, numerous SETAs have actively pursued and enjoyed success in establishing programmes aimed at meeting the country’s artisan training targets. The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) is no exception and has implemented some key projects.

In line with the Department of Higher Education and Training’s (DHET) directive of utilising South Africa’s TVET Colleges for the purposes of training artisans, the HWSETA has entered into a partnership with the Tshwane North TVET College (TNC) for the training of 100 learners in a two-year accelerated artisan development programme.

“The artisan training target of 30 000 artisans annually by 2030 is a massive challenge for South Africa, but if every role player that is able to participate does so, as a country we can succeed and it is because of this that the HWSETA sees this project as a valuable contribution not only to address the country’s artisan shortage, but also to address poverty, unemployment and inequality,” comments Yvonne Mbane, CEO for the HWSETA.

The HWSETA has committed R9.7 million of funding for the recruitment and training of the 100 learners over the two-year project period.

According to Mr Sello Sethusa, Acting Principal for Tshwane North TVET College, “This partnership with the HWSETA is expected to have a multi-faceted impact in that not only will it create jobs, alleviate poverty and skill artisans, but it will make a contribution to socio-economic development in the Tshwane Metropolis.”

“Whilst this project is expected to make an important contribution to the HWSETA in fulfilling its mandate of upskilling artisans in South Africa, the HWSETA has every intention of pursuing further opportunities that arise with other TVET Colleges that wish to partner with the HWSETA,” concludes Ms Mbane.

HWSETA Funds Animal Health Studies in Eastern Cape

At a function held in Tsolo, Eastern Cape, on 25 May 2015 the Health and Welfare Sector Education Training Authority (HWSETA) awarded 50 learners with full bursaries to obtain a Diploma in Animal Health from the Tsolo Agricultural and Rural Development Institute (TARDI).

The event was attended by the Deputy Minister of Higher Education and Training, Honourable Mduduzi Manana, the MEC for Eastern Cape Rural Development and Agrarian Reform, Mr Mlibo Qoboshiyane, the Mayor of Mhlontlo Local Municipality, Counsellor M Giyose, Chariman of the HWSETA Board, Dr Confidence Moloko, Ms Yvonne Mbane, CEO for the HWSETA, numerous other dignitaries, the learners and their parents.

“The partnership that the HWSETA has entered into with the Eastern Cape Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform is a significant milestone in pushing back the frontiers of poverty,” comments Ms Mbane.

Ms Mbane describes the partnership as ‘business unusual’, but is quick to add that this is a strategic intervention specifically aimed at addressing the shortage of skills in the animal health sector, which contributes towards food security.

19-year-old Wandile Sitandatu trekked more than a 100km from Kei Mouth to Tsolo earlier this year with one goal in mind, to become an animal health technician. He successfully registered for the three-year diploma at TARDI but he held out little hope that his unemployed mother would be able to afford the tuition fees of R20 000 per year.

“Immediately after I received the fee structure for my studies, my knees just went weak and I thought this is it for me, this is the end of my dream,” Sitandatu explained to the audience with tears in his eyes. “When I got home I showed my grandmother the fee structure and she also agreed we wouldn’t be able to pay.”

This all changed for the better when he was one of the 50 students who would receive funding from the HWSETA for his studies. Sitandatu believes that the bursary he has received from the HWSETA will open many doors for him.

Mr Qoboshiyane urged the learners to grab the opportunity with both hands. He described how his Department is intent on turning the Eastern Cape into a hub of activity and a food basket.

Learners and their parents alike were overwhelmed and expressed their joy and gratitude. One learner was given the opportunity to thank the HWSETA saying that ‘I do not know where I would have gone to or what I would’ve become if it was not for the bursary. My grandmother does not work, and with this I will be giving her hope too that the suffering will one day end’.

Qualification Development and Maintenance a Key Focus for the HWSETA

The skills development landscape in South Africa is one that requires constant change and innovative thinking on the part of Sector Education Training Authorities (SETAs) to meet the needs of the sectors they serve. The HWSETA is no exception and it is this mindset that resulted in the establishment of the Qualification Development and Maintenance (QDM) sub-division in October 2013 to focus on this key area of responsibility for the HWSETA.

“The delivery of quality training in South Africa requires a combination of accredited training providers that are able to deliver excellent quality training content and material,” comments Champa Gopal, Qualification Development and Maintenance Manager for the HWSETA. “By assessing and maintaining quality in these two critical areas, learners in South Africa are assured that the training they receive will enable them to make a positive contribution to the skills pool in the health and social development sectors.”

Since its establishment, the QDM sub-division has approached the task at hand with zest and the hard work is paying off.

The QDM sub-division, in partnership with the National Department of Health (NDOH) and International Training Education Centre for Health (I-TECH), has been successful at registering the Occupational Qualification: Health Promotion Officer (Community Health Worker) SAQA ID 94597 in November 2014. This qualification replaces three community health work (CHW) legacy qualifications in the form of CHW levels 2, 3 and 4.

The HWSETA will not accredit private skills development providers (SDPs) for this newly registered occupational qualification and this is a function that will reside with the Quality Council for Trades Occupation (QCTO). Accreditation of providers by the QCTO will be dependent on the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Department of Health (NDOH) ensuring the learner has a designated workplace with a mentor during the time of study to obtain the required workplace experience.

Ms Gopal adds that the accreditation processes for legacy qualifications will remain with the HWSETA and this should not be confused with the accreditation processes outlined by QCTO for registered occupational qualifications.

The HWSETA conducted workshops nationally to inform its stakeholder base of this shift in accreditation and implementation processes for this new occupational qualification, as well as qualifications that will be developed in future.

To date the QCTO has successfully accredited twelve regional training centers attached to the NDOH. A partnership pilot training project for 900 learners in twelve regional training centres commenced in March 2015.

Whilst the HWSETA will not be responsible for the accreditation Skills Development Providers for this occupational qualification, it has received approval from the QCTO to be the Assessment Quality Partner (AQP). As an AQP, the HWSETA is responsible for setting up final external summative examinations, co-ordination of national examinations through approved assessment centers, as well as assessment and recommendation of learner certification to QCTO.

The examination process and logistical arrangements will be conducted through partnerships with Community of Experts (CEP’s) to ensure seamless quality processes are applied. The ETQA will timeously announce all examination logistics.

“This is an important milestone for the HWSETA and we believe that what we have learnt during this process will pave the way for the development of occupational qualifications that will replace the thirty three legacy qualifications that the HWSETA is mandated to quality assure,” adds Ms Gopal.

The HWSETA has submitted the occupational qualification, Social Auxiliary Work to QCTO for registration with SAQA and is currently awaiting the outcome of this occupational qualification.

Within the next five years the HWSETA intends having all legacy qualifications re-curriculated into qualifications that will translate into occupations and ultimately provide the youth of the country an opportunity to follow a career within the Health or Social Services Sector .

“The development of occupational qualifications that are relevant to the labour market underpins the activities of the QDM sub-division and it is this thinking that drives us to achieve targets that will positively impact the health and social development sectors in the country,” concludes Ms Gopal.

 

HWSETA Urges Caution When Enrolling at Private Training Institutions

The South African Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) on a daily basis receive reports of students that have been the victims of unscrupulous training providers. Whilst this is a national problem, the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) is currently very concerned about the actions of several unscrupulous training or skills development providers operating in Kwa-Zulu Natal that claim to have the necessary accreditation from the HWSETA. These organisations have been reported to the relevant law enforcement agencies. Continue reading